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ADAPTIVE JIU JITSU

Yamasaki's DC's Adaptive Jiu-Jitsu Program is tailored to the circumstances of wounded warriors at the Walter Reed Military Medical Center, whose injuries include amputations, traumatic brain injuries and PTSD.

Our adaptive program brings a unique approach to rehabilitation and recreation that serves as a critical tool in the recovery of injured service members.  Participants must problem solve physical challenges in real time while adapting techniques to their specific injuries.  The students use this program as a way to re-learn vigorous body movements and mechanics while improving their cardiovascular and core fitness.

//  UFC 360

Our Adaptive Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program was recently featured in an article in UFC 360 -- the only official print publication of the UFC.  It's a great profile of the program and the inspiring guys who participate. You can find out how to download the article or purchase the magazine at www.ufc360.com.

 
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If this sounds like an ordinary jiu-jitsu class or sparring session, in some ways it is. There is a teacher, student, technique, application, and rolling. It’s part self-defense, part exercise, and all devoted to learning the art of jiu-jitsu. Yet, what Pantoja and Raffetto are doing is without precedent.
— UFC360
 

BEHIND THE SCENES

Take a look behind the scenes at UFC 360's visit to our Adaptive Jiu Jitsu program at Walter Reed Military Medical Center.

 

 //  IN THE NEWS

The Adaptive BJJ program and our students have also been profiled on Voice of America and the Pentagon Channel.  Take a look at the following videos to find out more:

VOICE OF AMERICA
"Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is not your typical martial art. It combines wrestling and joint manipulation, and those who practice it say technique trumps size. But Tyler Anderson is not your typical martial artist either. For the U.S. Army Staff Sergeant and recent amputee, learning this new skill is just one of his life's many challenges."

 

THE PENTAGON CHANNEL
"At Walter Reed Army Medical Center, one program is helping some wounded warriors maintain physical fitness."

//  SUPPORT ADAPTIVE JIU JITSU

Through the Henry M. Jackson Foundation, you can make a tax-deductible charitable contribution to the Adaptive Jiu Jitsu program.

Your donation will allow us to provide any necessary equipment and transportation directly to wounded service members, in addition to seminars and workshops.

 

// ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Please visit the Wounded Warrior Project and Henry M. Jackson Foundation for additional information on initiatives for wounded service members.